swirlswirlswirlswirlswirlswirlswirl

Full STEAM Ahead with Storytelling

Presented by Carrie Sue Ayvar, Storyteller/Cuentista

www.carriesueayvar.com csayvar@gmail.com

                                                                                                           

“Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Albert Einstein

 

The great scientist Albert Einstein once said, “If you want your children to be brilliant, tell them fairy tales; if you want them to be very brilliant, tell them lots of fairy tales.” Storytelling, one of the oldest and most universal forms of education, imparts information, stimulates the imagination and instills a love of language. Ask questions as you read and talk. Have fun with words and sounds and rhymes. Read, play, enjoy!

 

Stories, Stories Everywhere!

Where do we find stories? In books, from folklore (398.2 section of your library), from friends, families and storytellers. But don’t discount the ones you already know…and you do! Humpty Dumpty? (Math Lesson – Position Words!) Itsy Bitsy Spider? (Science Lesson - Did you know spiders can the size of a bug trapped on the web by the vibrations? Tie a string and pluck it to feel the vibrations!)  Nursery Rhymes and Finger Plays are often the first storytelling we share with our children. Finger Plays are basically Nursery Rhymes with hand gestures. A song can make transitions as easy as one, two, three and teach Steady Beat. Steady beat is an ongoing, steady, repetitive pulse or cadence. Studies have shown that steady beat or rhythm enhances language acquisition, helps children to focus and concentrate, understand space and distance and even better control their actions and improve behavior and correlates to success in math and reading.

 

Sampling of Songs:

 

Friends, friends, 1,2,3. All my friends are here with me. You’re my friend, you’re my friend, you’re my friend. Friends, friends, 1,2,3. All my friends are here with me. (Friends By Wolftrap Artist John Taylor)

 

Are we up on the mountain? No, no. Are we down in the valley? No, no.

Are we out on the playground? No, no. Everyone is here today.

Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Everyone is here today.

Are we swimming in the water? No, no. Are we playing in the park? No, no.

Are we hiding in the dark? No, no. Everyone is here today.

Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Is ____ here? Yes, yes. Everyone is here today.

 

On the Farm (tune of “The Wheels on the Bus”)

The cows on the farm go moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo. The cows on the farm go moo, moo, moo, all day long. Repeat with other animals and their sounds.

 

When ducks get up in the morning, they always say good day

When ducks get up in the morning, they always say good day

Quack, quack, quack, quack. That is what they say, and that is what they say

Quack, quack, quack, quack. That is what they say, and that they say

(repeat with other animals) Cow: Moo Horse: Neigh Cat: Meow Pig: Oink

 

Hey, Jim-A-long, Jim-A-long Josie. Hey, Jim-A-long, Jim-A-long Jo X2
Fly like a bird, Jim-A-long Josie. Fly like a bird, Jim-A-long Jo X2

Jump like a frog, Jim-A-long Josie., Hop like a kangaroo, Jim-A-long Jo

Swim like a fish, Jim-A-long Josie. Tiptoe like a mouse, Jim-A-long Jo

 

Here we go up, up, up, (raise hands high)

Here we go down, down, down. (lower hands)

Here we go forward, (take one step forward)

Here we go backward. (take one step backward)

Here we go side to side! (sway side to side)

 

Bumping up and down in my little red wagon 
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon. Bumping up and down in my little red wagon. 
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon. Won't you be my darling?
One wheel's off and the axle's broken. One wheel's off and the axle's broken.
One wheel's off and the axle's broken. Won't you be my darling?
Let’s get a hammer and go fix it. Let’s get a hammer and go fix it.

Let’s get a hammer and go fix it. Won't you be my darling?

Bumping up and down in my little red wagon. Bumping up and down in my little red wagon.
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon. Won't you be my darling?

 

Sample Story:  Folk Tale of the Noisy, Crowded House

Once upon a time a farmer lived in a house that was very small & very noisy. (Make three noisy events such as, Squeaky Door, Creaky Floor, Noisy Tree Branch.)  Man goes to Wise person for help and is told to bring the animals inside, one at a time. It is even noisier. At last the Wise person tells him to put all the animals back outside into the barn. His house still has all the noises it started with but seems so much quieter in comparison. Peace and quiet at last! Adding repeated phrases or dialogue encourages the children to participate in the telling. After the story is done, review it and question the students to assess their listening and observational skills. This can easily extend into several math lessons. Cardinal (1,2,3) or Ordinal numbers (1st, 2nd, etc.) Spatial Relationships (e.g., above, below, next to, beside, on top of, inside, outside) Number & Operations (More, fewer, How many altogether?) The children can become the animals from the story and show positional words in action; next to each other or beside, in front or behind. Use a die to decide how many of each animal was brought in.  Visually graph the number of animals. Use blocks to demonstrate another way to visually graph. There are many versions of this folktale including some wonderful picture books including Too Much Noise by Ann McGovern and A Big Quiet House by Heather Forest. Compare and contrast a book version with the story you told.

 

Sample Story: Russian Folk Tale of the Giant Turnip

Once there was a farmer who planted a turnip seed. It grew & grew & GREW!!! He tried to pull it out of the ground but the turnip wouldn’t come out. So his wife held on to hem an together they pulled but the turnip wouldn’t budge. Then the daughter and son and animals, from larger to smaller,  tried but the turnip wouldn’t come out.  At last the mouse offered to help. Everyone, working together and holding on to one another pulled and – Pop! – out came the turnip. There are many published versions of this story. Stories use science as inquiry. Think about process, choices, problem solving. Compare vegetables that grow above the ground and those that grow under the ground. Order by size. How many helpers did it take altogether to pull out the turnip?

 

Imagine That!

Pretend you have a flower in front of you. Look at it. What kind of flower is it? What color? What size? Reach out and pretend to pick it. Smell it. Mmmm. Point one finger in your other hand up, like a candle. Pretend the candle (finger) is lit. Smell your flower. With a pursed mouth, blow out your candle. Repeat each action 3 times.